Japan Lands Rovers on Asteroid

Ryugu

Ryugu, seen here, is a diamond shape asteroid about 1km across.

In quite an incredible technological feat, Japan has successfully landed two robotic rovers on an asteroid that’s just 1km across.

The MINERVA-II1 rovers were launched from the Hayabusa2 spacecraft which was orbiting, the asteroid dubbed Ryugu. They sent back a few images on their way down, several which were a bit blurry, but a couple of nice ones. Including this one, which clearly shows the asteroid just before the rover touches down:

Photo from MINERVA-II1

The robots are designed to capitalise on the low gravity on the asteroid, by hopping, rather than rolling, along its surface. They will send back data and images that the lead scientists hope will answer questions about the formation of the universe.

Next month the orbiting spaceship will deploy explosives to the asteroid so the rover can look below its surface. Following that, yet another rover, a collaborative effort between French and German scientists will be sent to the asteroid to explore even further.

Read more: JAPAN’S SPACE ROVERS SEND PICTURES BACK AFTER FIRST EVER SUCCESSFUL LANDING ON ASTEROID

ISS Sabotaged?


The International Space Station has a hole in it. Last week after noticing a drop in pressure inside the station, the official statement was that a meteorite had caused the hole.

Now the story has changed. Apparently, the hole was done with a drill, either accidentally or on purpose, either on Earth or in space. 

As you can see in the picture, there are marks from a sliding drill, so they think that it could just have been a bungling technician who slipped and made the hole and glued it up without telling anyone, and now the epoxy has come lose.

At any rate, the astronauts have fixed it temporarily with epoxy, so they are safe for now. If they hadn’t caught it, they would have run out of air in 18 hours!

Read more: https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/gadgets-and-tech/news/nasa-iss-hole-man-made-international-space-station-roscosmos-human-a8522036.html